Ive been painting...

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گرامر انگلیسی در شش دقیقه

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Ive been painting...

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Neil and Catherine talk about the present perfect continuous. Find out which one to use when, listen out for lots of examples and see if you can score top marks in our quiz.

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Neil
Hello and welcome to 6 Minute Grammar with me, Neil.

Catherine
And me, Catherine.

Neil
Today we’re talking about the present perfect continuous tense.

Catherine We’ll remind you when to use it and how to form it…

Neil
We’ll also look at using it with the words just and already and other adverbs.

Catherine
And we’ll finish with a quiz. So let’s kick things off with an example of the present perfect continuous, read for us by Finn.

Finn I’ve been reading that book you lent me last weekend… it’s great!

Catherine Thank you Finn. So I ‘ve been reading… is an action that started in the past and is continuing in the present: Finn is still reading that book. Here’s another example:

Finn It’s been raining since 9 o’clock this morning.

Neil It has! It started raining in the morning, continued raining and it’s still raining now.

Catherine We can also use the present perfect continuous for actions that have recently finished. An example, please Finn.

Finn I’ve got paint all over my clothes because I’ve been decorating the living room.

Neil Ah, so Finn’s got paint all over his clothes, and that’s the evidence he was painting but now he’s finished. Another example please, Finn:

Finn Joe! Where have you been? I’ve been trying to get hold of you… I’ve got some bad news.

Catherine So, Finn has finally managed to find Joe. The action of looking for Joe has finished but Finn was looking right up until the moment he found him.

Neil To say how long an action has been happening for, we can add a time expression.

Finn Jack has got a big concert tomorrow. He’s been rehearsing all day .

We’ve been going to the same hotel for the last ten years .

Neil Earlier, Finn said: it has been raining since 9 o ‘clock this morning .

Catherine For three hours, for the last ten years and since 9 o ‘clock this morning tell us how long the activity has been happening.

Neil The present perfect continuous is often used with the words already and just .

Catherine That’s right, we can use already if an action hasn’t finished, and we want to emphasise how long it’s been happening. Finn:

Finn She’s alread y been sleeping for three hours.

This chicken has already been cooking for two hours.

Catherine We use just when the action has already finished - and we want to emphasise how recently it finished.

Finn There’s Yasemin - I’ve just been talking to her husband on the phone!

Catherine We can also use recently or lately to say that a situation or action finished only a short while ago, but they are a little further back in time than just . So, Neil, have you been doing anything special recently …

Neil Well, I’ve been trying to lose a bit of weight recently, so I’ve been going to the gym after work.

Catherine
It’s starting to show a little bit.

Neil Yes. How about you, Catherine…?

Catherine Well, I’m afraid I haven’t been going to the gym because I’ve been feeling rather tired lately and I haven’t been sleeping very well.

Neil You’ve been working too hard! Now, we form the present perfect continuous with the subject plus have or has and the present participle of the main verb. Here are some examples:

Finn Jack has been working hard.

It’s been raining …

I’ve been reading that book …

Catherine And for negatives, it’s subject plus haven ‘t or hasn ‘t and the present participle .

Finn I haven’t been sleeping very well.

Catherine We usually put just and already between have or has and the past participle . So it ‘s She’s already been sleeping for three hours.

Neil … and I’ve just been talking to her husband ….

Catherine But time expressions usually go after the main verb. So it’s Jack’s been studying all day .

Neil And don’t forget to use short forms like I ‘ve… It’s… haven’t… hasn’t with the present perfect continuous.

IDENT

6 Minute Grammar from the BBC.

Catherine And we’re talking about the present perfect continuous.

Neil We use it to talk about an activity that started in the past and is continuing now or has recently finished.

Catherine And we often use it with the adverbs just and already , and with other time expressions like recently and lately .

Neil Time for our quiz. Number one. Which is correct? The chicken only needs another fifteen minutes. It’s a) …already been cooking for two hours, or b) It’s just been cooking for two hours.

Catherine
And that’s a) because the chicken is still cooking.

Neil That’s correct. Number 2. a) Where have you been? I wait for you for half an hour. b) Where have you been? I’ve been waiting for you for half an hour.

Catherine It’s b) because you use the present perfect continuous to say how long you have been doing an action.

Neil Finally, number 3. a) You’ve been listening just to 6 minute grammar. b) You’ve just been listening to 6 minute grammar.

Catherine
It’s b) because just goes between the auxiliary have and been .

Neil Correct and it’s the end of the show. There’s lots more about this on our website at bbclearningenglish.com. Join us again for more 6 Minute Grammar soon.

Both Bye.

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