Adverb position 1

دوره: گرامر انگلیسی در شش دقیقه / اپیزود 45

گرامر انگلیسی در شش دقیقه

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Adverb position 1

توضیح مختصر

Callum and Catherine, with Finns help, talk about the three positions where adverbs usually go when used with verbs. They also explain where to put adverbs when used with modals, questions and negatives.

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Callum Hello and welcome to 6 Minute Grammar with me, Callum .

Catherine And me, Catherine . Hello.

Callum
In this programme we’re talking about adverbs and where they should go. Catherine, remind us what adverbs are.

Catherine
Certainly Callum. Adverbs are words or phrases that we use to give more information about verbs, adjectives or other adverbs. We use them to express how someone does something or how something happens.

Callum In today’s programme we’re going to focus on how they are used with verbs. Listen out for the adverbs usually , really , hardly and ever . Here ‘s Finn.

Finn I usually drive to work. I usually drive to work. I don’t really like cheese. I don ‘t really like cheese. I can hardly believe what happened at the concert. I can hardly believe what happened at the concert. Have you ever been to Scotland? Have you ever been to Scotland?

Callum Now, let’s look more closely at where to put the adverb.

Catherine Adverbs can usually be placed in one of three positions.

Callum The first position is at the very beginning of the sentence, before the subject.

Finn Usually I drive to work.

Catherine The second position is before the main verb.

Finn I usually drive to work.

Callum And the third position is after the direct object or complement of the verb.

Finn I drive to work usually .

IDENT
You’re listening to BBC Learning English.

Callum Today we’re talking about where to put adverbs when we are using them to give more information about verbs.

Catherine We’ve seen that there are three positions where adverbs typically go.

Callum So is it the case that you can put any adverb in any of these positions?

Catherine Callum, if it was that simple, it would be fantastic. Many adverbs can indeed go in any of these positions, depending on style and context.

Callum I feel there is a ‘but’ coming.

Catherine But…

Callum Ah, there it is…

Catherine But that’s not always the case. Some adverbs can’t go in certain places and some are more common in particular positions than others.

Callum And we also have to consider modals and other auxiliaries, questions and negatives.

Catherine We do. So let’s start with the verb to be . When the verb to be is the main verb of a sentence, we usually put adverbs immediately after the verb.

Finn He’s always on time. I was never happy at school.

Callum When there is more than one part to the verb, where does the adverb go?

Catherine If there is an auxiliary such as have or has in the present perfect or a modal like can, will, should and so on, the adverb usually goes after the auxiliary and before the main verb.

Finn You can never predict what mood he is going to be in. I’ve rarely seen him angry. I will always love you.

Catherine And I’ll always love you Finn. The same is true in negative sentences. The adverb will come after the negative and before the main verb.

Finn I’ve never visited Iceland. I ‘ve never visited Iceland. He can’t even make a cup of tea. He can ‘t even make a cup of tea.

Callum What about questions?

Catherine The same is true there. The adverb comes after the question word or auxiliary and before the main verb.

Finn Do you still live in the same city? Do you still live in the same city? Would you really like me to come and stay? Would you really like me to come and stay? Have you ever thought about emigrating? Have you ever thought about emigrating?

Callum Now, are there any places where you can’t put an adverb?

Catherine There are. Adverbs don’t go between a main verb and its direct object. So for example could I say: I play very well tennis?

Callum Well you could say it, but it wouldn’t be right.

Catherine OK then, how about this? I play tennis very well.

Callum That’s correct, though only grammatically.

Catherine What do you mean?

Callum Well actually you play tennis awfully!

Catherine That’s true actually Callum, yep.

Callum We’re nearly at the end of today’s programme, just time to take our quick quiz on this topic.

Catherine You’re going to hear some sentences and you need to decide if the adverbs are in the correct place. Here’s the first one

Finn You always must remember to lock the door when you leave. You always must remember to lock the door when you leave.

Callum This one is…. not right. The adverb always should come after the modal ‘must’ and before the main verb ‘remember’. Here’s the next one.

Finn I have never learned a foreign language. I have never learned a foreign language.

Catherine This is… correct. The adverb, in this case never comes between the auxiliary ‘have’ and the main verb ‘learned’. And the final sentence.

Finn She rarely is late.

Callum This is… not correct. The adverb rarely should come after the verb ‘to be’.

Catherine So that’s our introduction to the position of adverbs.

Callum Do check our website bbclearningenglish.com for more information on this subject.

Catherine And do join us again for more 6 Minute Grammar

Both Goodbye

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